Progress Review of GTZ Project "Family Health Management for Poor Urban Settlers (Famus)"

Country: 
Philippines
Area of competence: 
Integrated Primary Health Care
Donor organization: 
GIZ (German Agency for International Cooperation)
Start of Project: 
09/1998
End of Project: 
10/1998
Staff-month: 
1
Value of service: 
€ 14,000
Partner Organisations: 
-
Description of Project: 

Within the scope of the Philippines National Health Policy, the German Agency for Technical Cooperation (GTZ) supported the above project. Many organisations in the Philippines had a high degree of engagement in the community. The project took advantage of this and of the experiences of a former project supported by GTZ which was related to community promotion.

Description of Services: 

The project goal was to improve the health situation of poor people in urban areas, especially of women, children and adolescents in selected project areas. In order to reach this goal, the project aimed at increasing knowledge about health risks and to improve health self-management capabilities; to improve capability of community organisations to manage family health activities; to expand services for reproductive health; to improve and expand community procurement systems for drugs; and to develop a strategy for family health issues. Specific activities included: Monitoring of the project progress in a systematic analysis of project planning, implementation and effects Assessment of progress in respect to national health policies Analysis of the conceptual approach Appropriateness, cost and sustainability of poverty assessment systems Efficiency and sustainability of family health services Analysis of hindrances for utilisation of family health services Alternative approaches to reach communities at all levels Efficiency and sustainability of drug distribution systems (including cost recovery) Monitoring and evaluation systems Project management at national and local level Development of a concept for the follow-up phase Opportunities and limitations for increasingly incorporating the private sector